Arthroplasty
(Hip - Knee - Shoulder Replacement)

a1Total hip arthroplasty, which is the replacement of a painful joint that has been destroyed, constitutes the operation of the century. It was first presented in the early 1960s by Sir John Charnley, in a presentation for the treatment of osteoarthritic joints in elderly patients, and showed very positive results. Nowadays, young patients ask for total hip replacements, hoping to improve their quality of life and return to their normal, everyday activities.

a2The progress in biomedical technology has led to the development of novel techniques and prostheses, as well as in the selective use of cement, depending on the case. The use of new and enhanced materials and plans for implantation results in a lower friction coefficient, allowing for greater loads, better movement and increased stability. The development of minimally invasive surgical techniques (MIS) limits possible damage of soft tissue, leading to an accelerated recovery, without compromised long term results (hopefully). Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery will contribute to the design and perfect placement of the materials, significantly.

Furthermore, the economic restrictions imposed by modern health systems act as a main trigger for th
e aforementioned improvements. The result is not only more sophisticated materials, but a decrease in cost of the operation, as well. Even though the biological repair of osteoarthritic joints is only a theoretical possibility, total hip replacement will remain the gold standard operation for their treatment in the ultimate future.

The surgeon is a m
ember of EEXOT (Hellenic Assossiation for Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma), the Orthopaedic Assossiation of Macedonia – Thrace, and and affiliated member of AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons).